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Discover & Research

Research fellows 2006

Each year our fellowship programme enables artists and researchers to develop their work.

In 2006 our visiting fellows included Anna Dezeuze, David Hulks, Uta Kornmeier, Mariko Leino, Anna Lovatt, Cassandra Albinson, Franka Hornschmeyer, Claudia Mesch and Mark Wilsher.

Anna Dezeuze

University of Manchester

Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship
2005-07

The ‘Almost Nothing’: Dematerialisation and the Politics of Precariousness

David Hulks

University of East Anglia, Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts

Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship
2004-06

Adrian Stokes and the Changing Object of Art (1930-72)

Dr David Hulks is currently conducting research into sculpture studies in the twentieth-century avant-garde (inter-war, post-war, post-minimalist, contemporary) and public sculpture (Elizabethan origins, classicism, East Anglian survey).

He is also interested in world art studies (new theoretical perspectives, historiography) and art education: critical curriculum (critical studies), art & assessment (national curriculum), cross-cultural (comparative studies), multidisciplinary (cross-curricular and collaborative working).

Uta Kornmeier

Oxford University

Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship
2004-06

Taken from Life: Madame Tussaud and the Pantheonic waxworks display

Mariko Leino

Oxford University

Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship
2005-07

Italian Renaissance Plaquettes in Context

Anna Lovatt

University of Nottingham

Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship
2005-07

The role of drawing in New York based sculptural practices of the late 1960s and early 70s

In her examination of the relationship between drawing and sculpture in this period, Dr Anna Lovatt pays particular attention to the work of Ruth Vollmer, Mel Bochner, Eva Hesse, Sol LeWitt and Dorothea Rockburne.

Her current research interests include Post-war American drawing, particularly in the context of post-Minimal and Conceptual art; the diagram in twentieth-century art and theory; transatlantic dialogue in Conceptual art; and legacies of the 1960s in contemporary artistic practice.

 

Cassandra Albinson

Assistant Curator, Yale Centre for British Art

Research Fellowship
2006

Dalou’s seated female figures

Cassandra Albinson carried out research for an exhibition around a terracotta statuette depicting Mrs. George Howard, by the nineteenth-century French sculptor Aimé-Jules Dalou, which is in the collection of Castle Howard.

Dalou’s seated female figures have been mostly seen as anonymous genre statuettes, but the known identify of the Castle Howard piece suggests that such works can be read much more specifically as portraits. Albinson will curate an exhibition of these figures for the Institute in 2008.

Franka Hornschmeyer

Artist, Berlin

Research Fellowship
2006

The Physiological and Psychological Experiences of Space

By treating space like a material, artist Franta Hornschmeyer creates installations that redefine the physical architecture and the subjective experience of a room’s structure and dimensions.

During her fellowship she investigated the spaces of the Henry Moore Institute and the wider environment of Leeds, returning on 12 October for Leeds Light Night 2007 to present her take on the city.

Claudia Mesch

Assistant Professor, Arizona State University

Research Fellowship
2006

Büro Berlin

Claudio Mesch examined key projects undertaken in the 1970s by the Büro Berlin, a collective that involved Hermann Pitz, Fritz Rahmann, Raimund Kummer and other artists, in creating collaborative installations that tested the possibilities and limits for conceptual art practice in public spaces.

Mesch’s research will form part of a book-length study on Art and Demarcation: Around the Berlin Wall 1961-1989.

Mark Wilsher

Artist, Norwich

Research Fellowship
2006

Abstract Public Sculpture

As well as being a practising artist, Mark Wilsher works as a writer, teacher, and curator. He has recently been making works that re-engage with abstract public sculptures dating from the late 1940s to the 1980s. Such works – often large composites made of metal, and many by artists that have been forgotten today – continue to have a life in the form of photographs in old journals and catalogues.

Wilsher used his fellowship to study these works, and his resulting body of new work will be on show at the Institute in 2008. In 2007 his work was included in the Institute show Drawing on Sculpture: Graphic Interventions on the Photographic Surface.

Mark Wilsher, 'Unfinished Business (Harmer)' 2008, ink on photograph. Courtesy the artist.

Previous Research Fellows

Find out more about previous research fellows and their projects.